The Wurzels AVES Germany Releases


Record releases by The Wurzels outside the UK are poorly documented as this was something managed by EMI worldwide rather than something that the group themselves were able to control - so this may be a page that will be updated and expanded as more information becomes available!

So far it appears that EMI Germany released two singles of Wurzels material - unless you can tell us more of course!


7" Vinyl Single

1976:
I Am A Cider Drinker b/w The Back Of My Old Car


This first single released by The Wurzels in Germany in 1976, but unlike the UK version it was marked as 'stereo'. It was released by Metronome Records on the Aves record label, catalogue number 39.013, who specialised in German-speaking releases by foreign groups. However, on this single, the vocals were in English.
Side A Matrix:   0105 840 S1 PF 39.013-AC
Side B Matrix:   0105 840 S2 PF 39.013-BC

The picture sleeve for this single is interesting in that it has a clear spelling error in the title of the B side track ('Pack' instead of 'Back'). This error is on all printed sleeves but does not extend to the label on the record itself.


7" Vinyl Single

March 1979:
O Du Schoner Westerwald b/w
Das Humbta Tatare

This was the only single released by The Wurzels sung in a foreign language - in this case German! the tracks have never been released elsewhere so are something of both an oddity and a rarity! It was again released on the Aves record label, catalogue number INT 111.505.
Side A : Matrix - IP INT 111 505 A
Side B: Matrix - IP INT 111 505 B

The picture sleeve for this release had exactly the same image back and front, the photo coming from a promotional shoot made in the UK in 1977, and as Pete Budd said whilst in conversation with Professor Wurzel

"The recording of this single was arranged by Bob Barratt of EMI records. EMI Germany sent someone across to the UK to teach The Wurzels to sing in German, the backing band being English session musicians. We had a lot of fun with that [session] and a while after I wrote the words for Weston-Super-Mare using the ‘umpta umpta ta ta ra’ which was a German marching song. Also, we got to wear leather lederhosen with Wurzel scarfs. What a gas! and as Tom used to say my legs looked as though they were pinned to my shirt-tail, how sexy was that!"